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The Truth About Dodgeball and Tag

Today's guest post comes from Lee Taft, creator of the Certified Speed and Agility Coach (CSAC) offering, which is on sale for $100 off through the end of the week. I'm a big fan of this resource and would strongly encourage you to look into it if you work with athletes in any capacity. Anyway, enjoy the post! -EC

If we listen to those making the decisions to eliminate dodgeball and tag in Physical Education (unfortunately there are some PE professionals not doing their best, so it appears these games are useless or harmful) we might come to the conclusion they are correct in doing so. But, if we edit the purpose and role of these "types" of activities, we see just how WRONG they are.

1. Dodgeball should be the culmination of a well thought-out and progressed throwing, catching, and agility unit. Students from primary grades on should learn how to properly throw, hit still targets at various heights and angles, and catch a ball coming at them from different angles and speeds (in primary grades, sometimes we just want kids to be able to touch the ball as it comes near them to develop tracking and limb location).

2. We need to progress to throwing at a target in which the target is moving, AND when the student who is throwing is moving, AND when both the target and student is moving. This teaches leading and directional aiming skills. And, it teaches students to predict intersection points.

3. We need to use a type of ball that takes fear out of catching, throwing, or being hit. There is nothing wrong with getting hit by a ball. It teaches kids how to protect themselves from objects coming at them. It sharpens their reflexes/reactive abilities. It trains their feet, core, and vestibular system to quickly protect through bending, twisting, jerking away, ducking, dodging while maintaining spacial awareness and balance. These strategies are very important to acquire and develop at young ages!

4. Catching is a fundamental tracking skill that allows for advancements to sports requiring a racquet, stick, or bat. When kids learn to catch, they are creating awareness of limb length to reach length. This, in turns, allows them to make adjustments to their limb length plus an implements length (e.g., stick, bat) and an oncoming ball in order to strike or catch it.

5. Tag teaches problem solving with regards to several factors. These factors are how much speed is needed to solve a problem of tagging or not getting tagged. When their speed isn't "good enough," they now select abilities of creating angles that can "even the playing field" and solve their problem. They use fakes, and spins, and change of pace to elude - as well as tactics to avoid being faked.

6. Games that involve avoiding being struck by a ball or tagged by a classmate drive to the heart of the CNS. It requires the student to learn from their environment and problem solve. These activities are primitive in nature and TAKING THEM AWAY ERODES at these primitive skills that give us foundational movement skills, tracking skill, timing skills, targeting skills, and evasive skills. When we lose touch with these skills (or abilities) we subject these potential future athletes to being exposed on the playing fields with less athletic armor.
Stop looking at these types of activities as useless. They carry a huge primitive foundational movement and developmental package. Use them in favor of our kids.

As I mentioned, Lee's certification is actually on sale through the end of the week for $100 off the normal price. If you're looking for top notch direction in coaching movement training with your athletes, look no further. You can check it out HERE.


 

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Strength and Conditioning Stuff You Should Read: 11/9/18

I hope you've had a good week. To kick off your weekend on the right foot, I've got some good reading from around the strength and conditioning world.

First, though, I just wanted to give you a heads-up that I'll be speaking at Pitchapalooza near Nashville in early December as part of an awesome lineup. You can learn more HERE.

Maximum Strength Training for Tennis: Why You Should Do It - Matt Kuzdub authored a great guest post for EricCressey.com a few months ago, and this was another recent post of his in the tennis world. Much it it could be applied to other sports as well.

Your Glutes Probably Aren't to Blame for Sore Knees, but They Could Still Be Stronger - Here's a solid dose of reality with some actionable strategies from Dean Somerset.

5 Great Analogies for Training Baseball Players - A big part of getting results is clearing communicating with athletes, and analogies are an invaluable way of doing so. This article outlines some of my favorites for working with a baseball population.

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Strength and Conditioning Stuff You Should Read: 11/3/18

I hope your weekend is off to a good start. It's been a while since I published a compilation here, so there was quite a bit to sift through. Here's a little recommended reading and listening from around the 'net.

10 Tips for Better Sleep - This solid article from the crew at Examine.com includes a lot of strategies that are easy to implement.

Kelly Starrett on Building the Mobility WOD Empire - I'm a big fan of both Kelly and Mike Robertson (who interviewed him), so this podcast was a win/win for me.

How Environment Shapes Training Success - An interaction with a client earlier this week reminded me of this post I wrote up last year.

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Exercise of the Week: 1-leg Side Bridge

A lot of people write off side bridges as “too easy” without considering that there are actually a lot of progressions one can employ to make them more advanced. To that end, I really like the one-leg side bridge with the top leg on a bench as a great way to "own" the frontal plane.

A few notes:

1. Make sure the body creates a straight line from the head to the heel.

2. If you feel any discomfort on the inside of the knees, it's because you've set up incorrectly or just aren't strong enough to do this movement.

3. Imagine the weight distribution being 50/50 between the two points of contact (forearm and foot).

4. I’ll usually program this as 3-5 breaths (with a full exhale) per side in each set.

5. Typically, I'll include this as part of a D1/D2 pairing at the end of a training session. Usually, it'll be preceded by some kind of anti-extension core exercise like a rollout or fallout.

Enjoy!

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Indianapolis Seminar Announcement: November 11, 2018

I just wanted to give you a heads-up on one-day seminar with me in Indianapolis, IN on Sunday, November 11, 2018.

Cressey scapula

We’ll be spending the day geeking out on shoulders, as the event will cover Shoulder Assessment, Corrective Exercise, and Programming.  The event will be geared toward personal trainers, strength and conditioning professionals, rehabilitation specialists, and fitness enthusiasts alike.

Agenda

9:00AM-9:30AM – Inefficiency vs. Pathology (Lecture)
9:30AM-10:15AM – Understanding Common Shoulder Injuries and Conditions (Lecture)
10:15AM-10:30AM – Break
10:30AM-12:30PM – Upper Extremity Assessment (Lab)
12:30PM-1:30PM – Lunch
1:30PM-3:30PM – Upper Extremity Mobility/Activation/Strength Drills (Lab)
3:30PM-3:45PM – Break
3:45PM-4:45PM – Upper Extremity Strength and Conditioning Programming: What Really Is Appropriate? (Lecture)
4:45PM-5:00PM – Q&A to Wrap Up

Location

Indianapolis Sports and Fitness Training
9402 Uptown Drive
Suite 1600
Indianapolis, IN 46256

Continuing Education Credits

The event has been approved for 0.7 CEUs (7 contact hours) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA).

Cost: $199.99 

Click here to register using our 100% secure server!

Note: we'll be capping the number of participants to ensure that there is a lot of presenter/attendee interaction - particularly during the hands-on workshop portion - so be sure to register early, as previous offerings of this evan have sold out well in advance of the early-bird registration deadline.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Questions? Please email ec@ericcressey.com.

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Strength and Conditioning Stuff You Should Read: 9/21/18

I missed a week of this weekly recap in light of the big Sturdy Shoulder Solutions sale last week, so I've had a chance to stockpile some good stuff for you. Before we get to it, a friendly reminder that tonight at midnight is the early-bird registration deadline for the Cressey Sports Performance Fall Seminar. You can learn more HERE.

With the fall seminar in mind, I want to highlight some content from our presenters:

45 Lessons I've Learned Along the Way - Pat Rigsby is our keynote speaker at the fall event, and this was an outstanding post he just published on his 45th birthday.

How to Cultivate Intrinsic Motivation in Young Athletes - CSP-MA Director of Performance John O'Neil wrote up this article shortly after his 2014 internship with us, but the lessons still go strong today.

The Biggest Challenge in Offering Semi-Private Training - and How to Solve It - This was an awesome post on the business of fitness from my CSP-MA business partner, Pete Dupuis.

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Off-season Shoulder Sale!

Our professional baseball guys are rolling back in to kick off the offseason, so I wanted to offer a sale to celebrate this fun time of year. What better way to celebrate the unofficial start of the baseball offseason than to put my shoulder course, Sturdy Shoulder Solutions, on sale for $50 off through Sunday?

This product includes over six hours of cutting edge assessment, coaching, and programming strategies. You can learn more at the following link (with the discount automatically applied):

http://www.SturdyShoulders.com


Here's what you'll experience:

  • Simplifying Shoulder Health (Webinar)
  • How Posture Impacts Pain and Performance (Webinar)
  • Important Upper Extremity Functional Anatomy Considerations (Webinar)
  • The Proximal-to-Distal Principle (Webinar)
  • Nuances of the Neck (Webinar)
  • Rethinking the Thoracic Spine (Webinar)
  • Making Sense of Serratus Anterior (Webinar)
  • Is Upper Trapezius the Devil? (Lab)
  • The Myth of Normal Range of Motion (Lab)
  • Rethinking the Thoracic Spine (Lab)
  • Making Sense of Serratus Anterior (Lab)
  • Good Exercises Gone Bad (Lab)
  • The Myth of Balancing Pushes and Pulls (Lab)

It's a great fit for personal trainers, strength and conditioning coaches, sports coaches, and rehabilitation specialists. Additionally, many fitness enthusiasts will appreciate the focus on individualizing programming recommendations and technique coaching strategies.

In particular, it’s a tremendous fit for anyone who has previously been exposed to our Optimal Shoulder Performance and Functional Stability Training products. Sturdy Shoulder Solutions serves as an up-to-date companion to the educational material covered in those previous offerings.

You'll get instant online access to this digital-only product after purchase. Just head to http://www.SturdyShoulders.com to pick it up.

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Strength and Conditioning Stuff You Should Read: 9/3/18

Happy Labor Day! I hope you're enjoying a long weekend with family and friends. In case you get a few quite minutes to catch up on some reading and listening, here are some good things to check out:

International Youth Conditioning Association High School Strength and Conditioning Certification - I was one of the contributors on this resource, and it's on sale for $100 off using the coupon code HSSCSFLASH through Tuesday at midnight.

9 Ways to Help People Change While Staying Within Your Scope - I thought Krista Scott-Dixon did an excellent job with this article for Precision Nutrition. As she notes, sometimes, the line between "coach" and "therapist" gets very blurred.

Stacey Hardin on Purposeful Collaboration in Pro Sports - I loved this podcast from Mike Robertson, who interviewed Stacey Hardin of the Minnesota United soccer club. There was some great information on how sports medicine teams should collaborate for the best care for the athletes they serve.

Forget About Squat Depth - This was an excellent JL Holdsworth article about why squat depth should be individualized to each lifter.

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The adductors (groin muscles) have a complex structure, but a solid knowledge of functional anatomy in two specific regards can help you to keep these tissues healthy. 👇 First, stretching into abduction alone isn't enough. You have adductors that flex the hip, and others that extend the hip - so you have to account for both in your mobility work. Second, they have a large cross sectional area that runs from just above the knee all the way up to the pelvis, so you need to use both broad and specific approaches to self myofascial release. Swipe left to check out some approaches you can implement to cover all your bases. 👍 1️⃣Adductor Rolling w/Med Ball on Table: Just don’t make eye contact with anyone while doing this one. 2️⃣Adductor/Ab Rolling on Lacrosse Ball: You’re working on the adductor tendons as they attach on the pubis (bottom of the pelvis). 3️⃣Split-Stance Kneeling Adductor Mobilizations: Stretch the hip into both flexion and extension without substituting low back motion. 4️⃣Half-Kneeling Adductor Dips: This “open” position can be more comfortable for those with limitations to hip internal rotation. This option also provides ankle mobility benefits. 5️⃣Split-Stance Hip Abduction End-Range Lift-offs: Here’s a good @functionalrangeconditioning inspired movement to build some motor control at end-range hip abduction to make ROM changes “stick.” Don’t let the hip “fall out.” 6️⃣Lateral Lunge w/Band Overhead Reach: Get the arms overhead without arching the lower back to integrate some core stability with your hip mobility changes. 💪 Give these a shot and let me know how they went in the comments below! #cspfamily

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Crossfit and Confirmation Bias

Last month, I published a blog about the importance of building strength in the teenage years. In case you missed it, you can read it here.

The gist was that strength is foundational to many other athletic qualities: power, stability, endurance, and even mobility. In short, building strength in untrained lifters is low-hanging fruit that can have a massive impact on other domains. However, if you train many of the qualities higher up on this pyramid early in a training career, you don't see very profound changes to athleticism. It's why the kid who just does agility ladders doesn't get much more agile, and the cross-country runner can't go faster just by running slow.

As is always the case with my new articles, I sent it out to my newsletter list - and there are always a dozen or so people who'll reply to the article. One, in particular, stood out for me:

"This reads as an incredible endorsement of multimodal training like Crossfit! Which highlights the very different skills in the article! Thanks for sharing!"

This is an incredibly well-intentioned person, but unfortunately, he could not be any more incorrect. And, it's a nice illustration of the confirmation bias we often encounter in the training world.

This gentleman really loves Crossfit, and that's fine. He can train a bunch of different qualities and have a lot of fun. That does not mean, however, that concurrent training of all these qualities is a way to optimize long-term athletic development in teenagers (or any age of athletes).  His confirmation bias leads him to believe that what he enjoys (and likely what has worked for him) will be good for every scenario he encounters.

Sure, you can build a lot of these qualities simultaneously, especially in untrained individuals. However, you are not going to develop a 95mph fastball or run a 10-second 100m dash if you're consistently rowing 1000m, doing sets of 15 power cleans, or rocking kipping pull-ups like they're going out of style. And, you're going to have a much harder time staying healthy as you embark on these goals, as each sport has unique energy systems requirements and position-specific demands. How often do you see aggressive hip-shoulder separation, appreciable single-leg work, and end-range shoulder external rotation in the typical Crossfit program?

Again, if you want to do these things, by all means, go for it and have fun - but don't confuse them with a plan that's optimized for athletes. Random programming might keep training novel, but it delivers random results - and athletic success is much more the result of targeted efforts to meticulously address the growth windows one can identify. In short, you can't take general solutions to specific problems.

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Strength and Conditioning Stuff You Should Read: 8/24/18

I hope you're having a good week. Here's a little recommended reading/listening to keep the ball rolling:

Is Your Gym Set-up Functional or Just Pretty? - This is an outstanding post from my business partner, Pete Dupuis. If you're a gym owner - or aspire to be one - it's a must-read.

The Road Less Stupid - I just finished this up as an audiobook, and it was outstanding. Lots of very good pearls of wisdom, whether you're looking for actionable business/coaching strategies or just some good one-liner quotes.

Strength and Conditioning Programs: When Precision Tops Effort - This is one of my favorite guest blogs at EricCressey.com, as John O'Neil did an outstanding job with it. I thought I'd reincarnate it in light of a conversation John and I had earlier this week.

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