Home Articles Six Lost Lifters

Six Lost Lifters

Written on December 26, 2007 at 12:18 pm, by Eric Cressey

I’m normally somewhat of a bookworm and science geek, although – to blow a little sunshine up my own butt – I have to say, I’m getting better at reading people.

T-Nation has been great for me in this regard. Your ordinary trainer might be exposed to 20 different clients in a week, and a typical collegiate strength coach might encounter 100 to 150 athletes over the course of a week. Like many others in this biz, I’ve been fortunate to experience both of those realms.

However, I do have a few legs up on my colleagues in this regard. I routinely get dozens of emails each day from readers, and have the opportunity to interact with the T-folk on our Author’s Locker Room threads and at seminars. I can also chat with other coaches, trainers, writers, and therapists on a daily basis.

So, effectively, I get a broader pool of athletes, coaches, health care professionals, rehab patients, and ordinary weekend warriors from which to form my perspective on things. Sounds like a lead-in to my memoirs, huh?

Shut up and get to the point already!

Okay, you don’t have to tell me twice. On the six-hour drive back from the D.C. T-Fest, I spent some time pondering who the typical T-Nation reader is. Hell, I’m writing articles for this typical lifter, so I might as well stop to consider what he really is.

After a few hours, it came to me: there is no “typical” T-Nation reader!

In fact, based on all the individuals I encountered in D.C., it was readily apparent that while all these folks had come to D.C. because they obviously wanted knowledge to help them achieve their goals, they all needed to be told different things – even in the broadest sense.

With that in mind, I came to identify six types of lifters that I see on a daily basis. Below, I’ll describe them and offer some suggestions on how to get the ball rolling if you realize you’re one of these lost individuals.

Read More
Experience the Event that took 30 Trainers, Coaches, and Athletes, to the Next Level

Eric Cressey

  • Mike Kramer

    Hi Eric-
    This article really spoke to me. I am 51 and have more or less using watered down bodybuilding programs since the 1970’s. I have gained some appreciable muscle mass and have developed a fairly balanced physique. I am in my 9th week of Maximum Strength and really love seeing my strength increase. I must admit that I get tempted to add more traditional bodybuilding exercises because I seem to notice my clothes feeling looser. I’m assuming this is because of loosing bodyfat. My ultimate goal is bodybuilding but I would like to gain strength. Would you recommend finishing up MS and then pursuing the Show N Go program? Basically, really love the gains in strength but would like to keep my physique in good shape at my “advanced age”. Probably the ego! 🙂 Would really appreciate your help. With kids and not enough knowledge, hard to take the time to write programs. Love your articles and the HS SC certification program!


LEARN HOW TO DEADLIFT
  • Avoid the most common deadlifting mistakes
  • 9 - minute instructional video
  • 3 part follow up series