Home Blog 5 Strategies to Avoid Overthinking Strength and Conditioning Programs

5 Strategies to Avoid Overthinking Strength and Conditioning Programs

Written on February 19, 2019 at 7:55 am, by Eric Cressey

I frequently run Q&A sessions on my Instagram stories, and sometimes, I’ll get an inquiry that warrants a detailed response that goes beyond a 15-second time limit of the small amount of text I can squeeze into a respond. This question is one such example:

The more I learn, the more stressful I find programming for athletes. Any tips for this?

First off, I should acknowledge that this is an incredibly common problems for not only new trainers, but experienced coaches as well. The curse of knowledge is a very real thing that can lead to a lot of frustrated tapping on the keyboard as you write up programs for clients that really don’t require things all that advanced. Here are a five strategies I’ve found to help:

1. Identify the biggest rocks and circle them.

After I write up all my notes on an evaluation, I go back and circle 2-3 things that I view as the highest priority items. Maybe it’s very limited cervical range of motion, or brutal single-leg strength. If it’s a resting heart rate in the 80bpm range, maybe we need to hammer aerobic capacity. Regardless, I find that when you definitively identify and highlight the highest priority items, it makes it easy to get the ball rolling on the program and build some momentum in the “don’t sit in silence and overthink things” direction.

2. Think quality movement first.

When joints move efficiently (work from “neutral”), it impacts a host of other systems. You take longer to shift from aerobic to anaerobic energy systems strategies. The length-tension relationship is optimized to enhance strength and power. The lymphatic system works more efficiently to optimize recovery. Effectively, moving efficiently has a “trickle down effect.”

These downstream benefits are why we take so much pride in our warm-ups. They shouldn’t just get your body temperature up, but rather, they should also work to reduce bad stiffness and improve good stiffness. For instance, with a back to wall shoulder flexion drill, we’re reducing bad stiffness in the lats, scapular downward rotators, and lumbar extensors. Meanwhile, we’re establishing good stiffness in the anterior core, deep neck flexors, and scapular upward rotators.

3. Acknowledge that you very well may never use some of the tools in your toolbox.

If you’re working with post-pregnancy women who are just looking to lose their baby weight, don’t expect to use French Contrast Training. And, if senior citizens are your niche, your extensive knowledge of plyometric progressions probably isn’t going to have much of an impact (sorry, bad pun).

If you hire a contractor to fix something at your house, he rolls in with his toolbox, but isn’t emotionally attached to the idea of using a chainsaw, hammer, screwdriver, or any other specific tool. Rather, he matches the right tool to the job in question, even if it means all the other tools are unused that day. You have to be willing to recognize that a ton of the things you’ve learned over the years may, in fact, be completely useless for you.

4. “Batch” your programs.

Believe it or not, I have an easier time writing a program for a professional baseball player with years of training experience with us than I do writing a program for an untrained female. The reason is very simple: I write a lot more programs for baseball players, so it’s familiar and I have a lot of related cases from which I can draw perspective (“X athlete is similar to Y athlete, so I can build on the success I had with that athlete instead of reinventing the wheel”). For this reason, try to write multiple programs for similar demographics in the same sitting instead of breaking them out to different programming sessions. As a general rule of thumb, I never sit down to write a program unless I’m doing at least 3-4 programs in that sitting.

5. Build on the previous program.

Most of the time, when I write a program, I’m writing it right over the top of the previous month’s programs, as doing so allows me to contemplate progressions and regressions quickly and easily. Never, ever start by staring at a blank programming template!

Wrap-up

In closing, remember that program design is only as complex as you make it. When in doubt, simplify!

This post delved into programming strategies, but the truth is that our programming is just one aspect of the systems that make our two Cressey Sports Performance facilities what they are. In our upcoming Cressey Sports Performance Business Building Mentorship, CSP co-founder Pete Dupuis and I will pull back the curtain on these systems to help other gym owners improve their systems. Our next offering will be April 7 at our Jupiter, FL location. For more information, click here.

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