Home Posts tagged "Pitcher Workout"

Prone External Rotation Compensation Patterns

Today, I've got a quick look at a common arm care substitution pattern we see when throwers are working on end-range external rotation. In the comparison video below, on the left, as the athlete gets to about 90 degrees of external rotation, he transitions to elbow flexion rather than using his posterior cuff to create clean external rotation. In the corrected version on the right, he slows it down and is able to actively tap into more of his (significant) passive ER.

You may also see athletes flock to elbow extension instead of ER, particularly when using bands/cables in the standing position. With that said, give this lengthier video I did previously a watch if you want to really dig in on the ways this drill can go wrong - but also how to progress it once you've got the technique locked in.

For folks who really struggle to compete against gravity with this, we can stand them up and work off the edge of a rack or doorway:

If you're interested in learning more about how we evaluate, coach, and program at the shoulder, be sure to check out my popular resource, Sturdy Shoulder Solutions.

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Elbow-Supported Dumbbell External Rotations: Do or Don’t?

The elbow-supported dumbbell external rotation is a pretty common exercise in strength and conditioning circles, but does it hold value for overhead throwing populations? In today's video, I answer that question:

If you're looking to learn more about how I assess, coach, and program for the shoulder, be sure to check out my popular resource, Sturdy Shoulder Solutions.

Sign-up Today for our FREE Baseball Newsletter and Receive Instant Access to a 47-minute Presentation from Eric Cressey on Individualizing the Management of Overhead Athletes!

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Elite Baseball Development Podcast: Should Pitchers Bench Press?

I'm flying solo for this week's podcast, as I wanted to tackle a controversial topic in the world of baseball strength and conditioning: pitching and the bench press. Before we get to it, though, a special thanks to this show's sponsor, Athletic Greens. Head to http://www.athleticgreens.com/cressey and you'll receive a free 10-pack of Athletic Greens travel packets with your first order.

Sponsor Reminder

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Sign-up Today for our FREE Baseball Newsletter and Receive Instant Access to a 47-minute Presentation from Eric Cressey on Individualizing the Management of Overhead Athletes!

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Exercise of the Week: Bowler Squat to J-Band Y

This week's exercise of the week is the brainchild of physical therapist Eric Schoenberg, who works out of Cressey Sports Performance - Florida. When I first saw him implementing it with a patient, I immediately thought, "How have I never thought of it?" You see, this drill actually combines two of my favorite exercises: the bowler squat and the J-Band Y. In doing so, we get an awesome arm care exercise that integrates single-leg balance and hip mobility.

The bowler squat component delivers a triplanar challenge to the glutes, as you have to eccentrically control hip flexion, adduction, and internal rotation on the way down - and it's actually overloaded in the transverse plane by the pull of the band. Here are some coaching cues and notes:

1. The upper arm should be at about a 135-degree angle to the torso so that it's in the line of pull of the lower traps. The upper extremity action should actually be driven by scapular movement into posterior tilt.

2. Most athletes should start with a J-Band Jr. before proceeding to a regular thickness J-Band.

3. As the athlete approaches the bottom of the movement on the lowering phase, he should try to get more hip motion than upper back motion. Although both are necessary, we've seen a lot of athletes who jump dump over into thoracic kyphosis (rounding) when they start to struggle. In other words, use the hips to deliver the hands.

4. The head should remain in line with the body to preserve a neutral cervical spine.

5. I generally prefer this to be done barefoot or in minimalist sneakers, like I'm wearing. It can be helpful to cue the athlete into "tripod foot" or tell them to "grab the ground like you're trying to picking a basketball with your foot."

6. We like this as a warm-up exercise or "filler" between sets of medicine ball work. We'll program it for sets of 8-10 reps on each side.

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